Food and Culture: The Food that Makes Singapore

In a country, the food sometimes becomes its identity. The people living in the country are the first thing foreigners in that country look to for culture, but the food is what pops out. Foreigners also search for the food when they visit a country, as it’s one of the easily identifiable traits of that country.

Singapore is best known for its food, which has similarities to those of its regional counterparts. Take a look at some of the food choices and see how it evolved to become what people on the streets are looking for.

Singapore’s Island-City status

Singapore was only recently founded; the 60s was its official foundation day as a city. However, it has already traded with its Southeast Asian neighbor even before becoming a city-state. In those days, traders would trade spices and valuable food. It would then influence the food of Singapore into what is commonly seen as hawker fare these days.

The Food Hawkers

You can’t go to Singapore and skip trying out food from the street hawkers. Southeast Asia has its own flavor and it is found on the streets. In Singapore’s case, the street food here is a fusion of food from the city-state’s neighboring countries. Char mee, ayam buah kelak, and Indian curry puff is just a few of these different food.

A very proud citizenship

Because it’s already a part of their culture, Singapore’s citizens are very proud of their food. It’s just that the citizens are pretty proud of their food that they are criticizing it every chance they get—its presentation, how it tastes, and its price most of all. A dollar’s worth of price hike is already an issue to the people.

The Hawkers today

The modern street hawkers can also be very touchy at how people eat the food they prepare. The price hikes can also be justified when you look at it from a modernization perspective; Singapore is quickly becoming globalized and, when imported ingredients become a part of street food, the prices tend to soar.

What the future of street hawking looks like

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Street hawkers evolve along with Singapore. With each younger generation taking to the streets, they have different inputs to already times and tested classics. Food being sold in the streets is already becoming a fusion of local and foreign ingredients. It can only mean good for the businesses and Singapore’s food culture as well.

A look at the past is good for your business’ future. If you think your street stall needs an injection of new ideas, take a look at how the evolution of street food hawking happened and figure out ideas from there.